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What's Fresh Right Now?

Bananas

Beans—green, green/yellow pole, green/purple long

Bitter melon

Chestnuts

Citrus—calamondins, limequats

Cucumbers—slicers, kirby, suyu

Eggplants—purple italian, purple asian, fairy tale

Greens—collards, tatsoi, curly/tuscan/white/red russian kale, mizuna, mustards, stir-fry mix, arugala, bok choy

Herbs—garlic chives, turmeric, parsley, cilantro, rosemary, italian/lemon/red basil, peppermint, spearmint, tulsi

Lettuce—bibb, romaine

Malanga

Moringa

Mushrooms—shiitakes, oyster, dried shiitakes/chanterelles

Okra—green

Onions—yellow, green

Papaya—ripe, green

Peas—white acre, zipper/creamer, black-eye, pink-eye (purple hull)

Peppers—red/green/yellow/orange sweet bell, green/red jalapeño, caribbean, assorted hot

Persimmon—astringent, non-astringent

Pineapple

Potatoes—red, white

Radishes—french breakfast, black, purple/white daikon

Roselle

Squash—green/yellow zucchini, acorn, butternut, yellow summer, seminole pumpkin

Sweet Potatoes

Taro

Tomatoes—plum, beefsteak, cherry

Turnips

Yuca

Local and Fresh—
Roselle


        Whether you call it roselle, rosella, Florida cranberry, Jamaican sorrel or cranberry hibiscus, the distinctive taste of these tart calyxes can liven up your recipes or create something new.
        Roselle is often dried to make teas and infusions, but fresh petals may also be tossed into fruit or veggie salads for a burst of flavor. Fresh roselle may also be cooked to make tea, jam, jelly or relish.
        A relative of hibiscus and okra, roselle grows as a bush and the calyxes alternate on long stalks. Look for firm dry roselle and store covered in the refrigerator.